29 May 13

The people who continue to define Gibraltar

When you book Gibraltar accommodation for a holiday in this part of the world, here at Visit Gibraltar, we would certainly encourage you to check out many of the cultural and historic attractions and activities, ranging from the Moorish Castle to the many regular artistic and literary events. We would also heartily endorse the local bars, restaurants, bistros and shopping opportunities but have you stopped to think of the kind of people that you are likely to meet?

When you book Gibraltar accommodation for a holiday in this part of the world, here at Visit Gibraltar (http://www.visitgibraltar.gi), we would certainly encourage you to check out many of the cultural and historic attractions and activities, ranging from the Moorish Castle to the many regular artistic and literary events. We would also heartily endorse the local bars, restaurants, bistros and shopping opportunities but have you stopped to think of the kind of people that you are likely to meet?

As you would expect of a part of the world with a history of immigration from so many different countries, Gibraltar is definitely cosmopolitan. Given that it has long been a British overseas territory, it shouldn’t surprise you that the British remain well-represented, in cultural and other terms. Gibraltar has a British-based educational system, after all, while British qualifications are required of just about all professions. You’ll even notice the likes of traditional British red phone boxes, post boxes and double decker buses on your Gibraltar holiday.

However, Gibraltar has also welcomed the likes of Spanish, Maltese, Moroccan, Genoese, Portuguese and Jewish immigrants over the centuries, so the around 30,000-strong Gibraltarian population of today boasts a fascinating, multi-racial mix. Most surnames in the territory tend to be of Mediterranean extraction, despite residents being British citizens, which contributes to the distinct identity of those living here.

A look at the religions practised in Gibraltar demonstrates the extent of this diversity. Although the majority of Gibraltarians belong to the Roman Catholic Church, there are various other Christian denominations, including the Church of England, Church of Scotland, Gibraltar Methodist Church, a Plymouth Brethren congregation and a series of Pentecostal and independent churches generally under the influence of the House Church and Charismatic movements. There’s also a long-established Jewish community, in addition to a Moroccan Muslim population as well as Hindu Indians.

Those on Gibraltar breaks are frequently struck by the peace and harmony that characterises relations between so many different races and followers of different religions. Another thing that will be of obvious relevance to you if you book a holiday here is language. As English is the territory’s official language, anyone who can understand this article will have little trouble conversing with others on their holidays in Gibraltar, although in casual conversion, the locals tend to use a “dialect” known as “Yanito” – which is a mix of English and Spanish.

Above all, though, it is a warm welcome that you can expect from the people of Gibraltar when you book a break here. There’s so much going on here all year round, and so many interesting people to meet... so why not peruse the Visit Gibraltar (http://www.visitgibraltar.gi) website for great Gibraltar travel ideas?